Fade

Tuesday, June 23, 2015

As the sun begins to set it brings the warmth of different shades of orange and red but what follows is the night which tempers this warmth. The appreciation of this little daily life occurrence is the essence of this short film Fade. The sunset was blissfully brought to life with clever usage of shadows and color changes. Watch the short film below:


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The first two shots of the short were establishing shots with a nice cold and warm color contrast. The visual contrast of the night creeping in and the warm light of the sun slowly receding immediately expressed the central idea of the film. The floating balloon and the strips of orange and red that followed quickly engaged the viewers’ eyes to lead it to the direction of the sunset. It’s a subtle preamble to the main action of the film which is the chase of the sunset.


The liveliness of the sunset was best expressed by the playful use of shadows and color. As the scarf and bicyclist pass by, the luminosity of color red seeps out to be taken over by the shadow of the night. The fading light of sunset making things less colorful is often left unobserved and the film captured this moment in such an endearing way.

Fade is part of Sun Rise & Set by Hajime Kimura.

Hibike! Euphonium - Episode 11

Tuesday, June 16, 2015

In the audition scene there were a few subtle changes in the camera movement in order to differentiate the performance between Kousaka and Kaori.  The clip below is a side by side comparison of their performance.


The camera work in Kousaka’s performance was more dynamic which gave her a superior presence as a performer. This of course supports the notion that she’s the better musician. The first example is when the camera pulled back from an extreme close-up of their eyes. In Kousaka’s performance the camera pulled back farther and faster. As you’ll notice in the shots above, for Kaori the camera pulled back to a medium close-up while for Kousaka it pulled back farther to a medium shot.

Another difference is the shot size of the concert hall during their performance. The first image above is a wide shot of the concert hall when Kaori was playing and the second image is an extreme wide shot of it during Kousaka’s performance. The extreme wide shot gave Kousaka’s performance a larger sense of scale, which conveyed the better resonance and sharpness of her trumpet playing.

Kousaka’s performance also had more camera movement. You might have noticed that the pans, tilts and lateral tracking shots had a wider movement during her performance. These camera movements also showed more of the audience and their reaction which gave her trumpet playing more impact than Kaori’s.